“Anyone can shoot chaos. But the most perceptive photographers can make compelling pictures out of uninteresting moments.”


Wednesday,  May 30, 2012


Anyone can shoot chaos. But the most perceptive photographers can make compelling pictures out of uninteresting moments. Alex Tehrani

A better way to state it is that nothing in this whole wide world is uninteresting if one can learn to see with fresh eyes, a fresh point of view. This has been called “beginners mind”  by such Zen illuminati as Shunryu Suzuki. This quality of “beginners mind” is perhaps the most valuable quality an artist can possess, because it enables her to start fresh each day, seeing the world anew. The world is not static or stale, each day provides new opportunities to see familiar things and places in new ways.

Here we have an old, weathered, fallen tree along the central Oregon coast, but look at the texture and growth rings!  Just like in the clouds, one can even glimpse, with just an ounce of imagination, hidden creatures within it’s form. The ordinary is seldom ordinary!

Enjoy,
Tom

“The photographer, if he is to maintain his integrity must be responsible to himself, he must seek a public which will accept his vision, rather than pervert his vision to fit that public.”


Wednesday,  May 23, 2012


The photographer, if he is to maintain his integrity must be responsible to himself, he must seek a public which will accept his vision, rather than pervert his vision to fit that public. Alexey Brodovitch

If your work does not reflect your vision, then who’s? I don’t necessarily agree one must pervert one’s work or vision to find a audience. One seldom works in a vacuum that no one else can relate to, but it may take a little longer to reach your public if your work is original. In the end, however, sticking to your guns, so to speak, will always result in a more satisfying career for the artist/photographer.

You can find these weathered stacks up and down the Oregon coast. They are spectacular photo subjects, as well as breeding grounds for many coastal species. They come in many, many shapes and sizes. This one is just south of Newport Beach, Oregon in the Seal Beach area.

Enjoy,
Tom

“Tell me, What is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?”

 

Friday, May 18, 2012


Tell me, What is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life? Mary Oliver

Good question, is it not? This is from a poem called The Summer Day. I try to consider this every day and every time I capture and work with my images. I don’t just want to create images, i wish to create images that have meaning and content that will perhaps inspire others to consider the wonder and beauty of life and the human sprit. Mankind wastes so many lives and so many resources on vain, senseless pursuits while living in the Garden, it’s not lost just hidden behind the veil of ignorance, hubris and desire. I choose to use my “one wild and precious life!”

This was captured at Seal Beach just south of Newport, Oregon. It was a overcast, chilly, spring day and I used a Singh Ray Blue and Gold polarizer plus a Singh Ray, Galen Rowell 3 step soft ND graduated filter to get the effect I was looking for.

Enjoy,
Tom

“I am not interested in showing my work to photographers any more…”


Wednesday,  May 16, 2012


I am not interested in showing my work to photographers any more, but to people outside the photo-clique. My pictures are not escapes from reality, but a contemplation of reality, so that I can experience life in a deeper way. Bruce Davison

I have a bit of this in myself these days, I am not interested in being judged by other photographers so much as I am in sharing my images with the public for their enjoyment. I create the images I do to express my personal vision, so I am not looking for approval. Since the images I create have meaning to me, I look to share them with others who’s imagination may be stimulated by them. Photographers tend to look at images with a technical brain, rather than an artistic insight. I am first and foremost an artist, truly I have technical skill in order to create my images but I like it best when those are almost invisible and the viewer is pulled in by the subject matter and the sprit of the piece.

Here I share an image of an iconic site in Central Oregon shortly before sunset. The sun was partially hiding behind  a craggy peak and there were some nice high clouds in the sky. I got a bit of sunburst off the peak as well as a bit of lens flare, which I feel adds to the overall spirit of this image.

Enjoy,
Tom

“The camera cannot express the human soul!” To which Adams replied, “The camera cannot, but the photographer can.“


Friday,  May 11, 2012


“…The camera cannot express the human soul!” To which Adams replied, “The camera cannot, but the photographer can. Ansel Adams

This was Ansel’s reply to his mother and aunt, who were pleading with him to not give up the piano in favor of photography. A very astute reply don’t you think? It’s up to us, not our equipment to “express” our feelings, our vision and to become proficient at communicating that to others. The tools are aids but it must come from within ourselves or we will have only snapshots.

I know some may disagree, but to me this is truly a “lovely” couple!

Enjoy,
Tom

“It should be possible for even the photographer – just as for the creative poet of painter – to use the object as a stepping stone to a realm of meaning completely beyond itself.”


Wednesday, May 9, 2012

 

“It should be possible for even the photographer – just as for the creative poet of painter – to use the object as a stepping stone to a realm of meaning completely beyond itself.” ~ Clarence John Laughlin

Well, today that is easier than ever with the software at our disposal. To take an image from here to anywhere one wants is quite possible. One still must have talent, vision and craft to create images that will reach out and touch the viewer. To my mind there is no reason the photographer cannot be an artist, there are no barriers to the creative with vision who wants to travel that road, which cannot be overcome with hard work and dedication to their craft!.

Here is an image that starts as a simple photo and transforms into something a little more.

Enjoy,
Tom

“The photographer projects himself into everything he sees, identifying himself with everything in order to know it and to feel it better.”


Friday,  May 4, 2012


The photographer projects himself into everything he sees, identifying himself with everything in order to know it and to feel it better. Minor White

This goes even deeper into the process of creation than the previous post. Here, not only do we “relax our beliefs,” but project our consciousness into that which we want to capture. Basho, the ancient Japanese Haiku poet speaks of this in his travel journal, so it is far from a new concept for the artist, but to me, a most important one. Without this “seeing into” you and the object remain separate, which makes it impossible to capture the object of your desire in a creative way.

This is an intimate view of a common Tulip tree flower. It’s a very beautiful flower despite it’s commonality, but you have to be still and look closely to see it.

Enjoy,
Tom

“We look at the world and see what we have learned to believe is there. We have been conditioned to expect…but, as photographers, we must learn to relax our beliefs.”



Wednesday, 
May 2, 2012

“We look at the world and see what we have learned to believe is there. We have been conditioned to expect…but, as photographers, we must learn to relax our beliefs.”Aaron Siskind

Excellent and wise advice for anyone, but absolutely essential for the artist! How would we ever be able to create something fresh without beginners mind? It’s an old saw that if you keep doing the same thing over and over, you’ll end up with the same results. I also believe that meditation is an excellent tool for the artist. I try to get into such a state when I look through my viewfinder in order to see with a fresh point of view. It can help in post processing as well, allowing you to bring fresh eyes to an image.

It can allow you to create images you might have never done without such a state of mind, such as this one.

Enjoy,
Tom