“Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life.”


Monday, November 29, 2010


“Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life.”     ~ Rachel Carson

I learned this from my earliest days, growing up deep in the country with the woods as my playground. If you are quiet and aware, wonders await you at every turn, every kind of creature imaginable appear before you, not to mention the plants, trees, flowers, berries, vines, waterways, springs bubbling up from the ground and more. The earth is a mother to countless beings and wonders, including ourselves. The “Lorax” speaks for the trees and I wish to speak for the silent earth in my images, to shed light on her incredible beauty and wonder.

Here is an image of just one of those wonders, just around one of those corners
I turned!

Enjoy,

Tom

“A thankful heart is not only the greatest virtue, but the parent of all the other virtues.”


Friday, November 26, 2010


A thankful heart is not only the greatest virtue, but the parent of all the other virtues.”     ~ Cicero

Happy day after Thanksgiving! It’s that time of year when Old Man Winter rules the land and men need the holiday season the lessen the burden of the dark, cold days and nights. That said there is still a lot to like and enjoy about the winter months; sitting by the fire, hiking in the snow, ice skating, just to mention a few, each of us have our own special things we love to do to fill the winter months.

Another joy, of course, is being able to get out and capture images in a winter wonderland. Here is one such image of some grasses left over from summer, with little birds enjoying the harvest on a cold winter’s day.

Enjoy,

Tom

“A photograph is always invisible, it is not it that we see.”


Monday, November 22, 2010


A photograph is always invisible, it is not it that we see.”     ~ Steve McCurry

At  least this is so if we have done our job well. Then the viewer will see our intent. What we saw and felt when the image was captured, or even what we wanted to see and feel when we captured the image! That is the joy of being an artist, communication with your fellow man.

Here is an image captured in the high desert of central Oregon of a derelict barn, still standing and enjoying the last of the day.

Enjoy,

Tom

“I think photographing people is simply a question of treating people with dignity and respect…”


Wednesday, November 17, 2010


“I think photographing people is simply a question of treating people with dignity and respect…”     ~ Steve McCurry

Respect for everything and everyone you image is almost an essential requirement to quality images. Think about it, how can you capture something of feeling, something that will grab others if you personally have no respect for your subject? You almost need a tender love for your subject to produce images of power and impact. Love what you do and do what you love!

Here is the brick over “pizza man” at my favorite Italian restaurant.

Enjoy,

Tom

“I’ve caught this magical landscape and it’s the enchantmen…”


Monday, November 15, 2010


I’ve caught this magical landscape and it’s the enchantment of it that I’m so keen to render. Of course lots of people will protest that it’s quite unreal, but that’s just too bad.”     ~ Claude Monet

How wonderful it this? It’s the “enchantment that I’m so keen to render.” In this Monet and I are in accord. Anybody can capture an image, but only the artist can see and then render the enchantment! And only by doing so can one capture the heart and soul of the viewer.

Here is another image of enchanted Mt. Hood.

Enjoy,

Tom

“At seventy-three I learned a little about the real structure of animals, plants, birds, fishes and insects…”


Wednesday, November 10, 2010


At seventy-three I learned a little about the real structure of animals, plants, birds, fishes and insects. Consequently when I am eighty I’ll have made more progress. At ninety I’ll have penetrated the mystery of things. At a hundred I shall have reached something marvelous, but when I am a hundred and ten everything I do, the smallest dot, will be alive.”     ~ Katsushika Hokusai

This is a great reminder that we always will have something new to learn, no matter how many years we work at our art/craft. Hokusai was famous for his 100 views of Mt. Fuji in Japan. I have the same love affair with Mt. Hood, here in Oregon.

Here is a view of this majestic mountain from its eastern side, looking westward.

Enjoy,

Tom

“Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not…”


Monday, November 8, 2010


Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not; a sense of humor to console him for what he is.”     ~ Sir Francis Bacon

Strange gifts, no? One finds humor everywhere in America, sometimes in the most unlikely places.

Here is an image of a fire hydrant in the tiny town of Fossil in central Oregon. He look too happy to be in chains!

Enjoy,

Tom

“So much of photography deals with the exotic…”


Friday, November 5, 2010


“So much of photography deals with the exotic, the other. For my project, “Somewhere in Middle America,” I set out to find the beauty and intrigue inherent in the familiar.” ~ Colin Blakely

There is much beauty to be had in the everyday and the familiar. The challenge to the artist/photographer is to capture it in a way that reveals it in a fresh way to the viewer. On top of that, some things, like tulip fields have been imaged so many times by so many great artists, the problem is multiplied.

I do believe that I managed to accomplish this here with this image, captured just up the road from me in Woodland Washington.

Enjoy,


Tom

“When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.”


Wednesday, November 3, 2010


When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.”     ~ John Muir

If only our world leaders and congresspeople were aware of this simple truth. It seems ignorance is the way to political success in these days. I find that disconcerting, because I love this planet and the nature that created it and mothered us, sacred. The more I explore, the more magical I find this globe.

In that spirit, who would expect to find this hill just sitting out in the open in central Oregon? Nature is so full of surprises, that I really should cease to be surprised, but I’m afraid I can’t help myself!

Enjoy,

Tom

“To photograph truthfully and effectively is to see beneath the surfaces…”


Monday, November 1, 2010


“To photograph truthfully and effectively is to see beneath the surfaces and record the qualities of nature and humanity which live or are latent in all things.”     ~ Ansel Adams

Here is another image of the wreak of the The Peter Iredale. Here we have a closeup that does “record the qualities of nature and humanity.” Although originally a tragic event in terms of humanity, now, with the many years of being subject to the forces of nature, it has become both an attraction for the curious, as well as possessing a very real beauty of texture, color and shape; transformed by time and natural events into something totally new and different from the original happening.

Enjoy,

Tom